big misunderstanding

Category Romance Review: Rumor Has It by Celia Scott

Celia Scott’s Rumor Has It is a modern-day Cinderella story where the fairy godmother is not an actual person but a false rumor that transforms a frumpy heroine into a glamorous new woman who finds her prince. 5 stars

rumor has it kalan

Historical Romance Review: Midnight Fires by Carol Finch

This review is of Midnight Fires by Carol Finch. This Zebra historical romance set during the war of 1812 is a typical Carol Finch book. It’s very good, but lacking the dynamic qualities to make it great. 4 stars

midnight fires carol finch

Historical Romance Review: Pirate’s Wild Paradise by Kate Douglas

This review is of Pirate’s Wild Paradise a standalone Zebra romance from February 1989 by Kate Douglas. The book starts in Port Royale, Jamaica, with the heroine about to get married. However, her ceremony is interrupted by our hero and Jamie’s former lover. 3 stars

pirates wild embrace

Category Romance Review: Song of the Waves by Anne Hampson

Wendy Brown is a not-yet-21-year-old Englishwoman who’s been given the worst news imaginable: she has an inoperable brain tumor and will die in a few months. Rather than spend her last days wallowing in despair, Wendy decides to make the best of her lot. Alone in the world, she sells her family home and buys a ticket for the maiden voyage of a glamorous cruise ship that’s set to sail the world. Thus begins Anne Hampson’s Song of the Waves, a vintage Harlequin Presents written in 1976. 4 stars

song of the waves

Historical Romance Review: Sarina by Francine Rivers

Sarina is a bodice ripper-lite written by Francine Rivers, the best-known and most successful author of Christian-centered, or “inspirational” romances. If you can read get your hands on this hard-to-find book, give it a chance. 4 stars

Sarina by Francine Rivers

Category Romance Review: Asking for Trouble by Miranda Lee

Asking for Trouble by Miranda Lee a beautiful, yet virginal woman and a burn-by-love playboy find passion together. Is it enough to last? The problem with reading a much-beloved author almost 50 times is that their books begin to blend together. Plotlines get replayed. And replayed. 2 stars

asking for trouble ed tadiello
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